Basal metabolic rate how do your calculate it?

The Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) is a useful measure to determine how much food you need to eat each day. This measure is the amount of energy that a person uses when they are at rest all day. To make sense of the BMR just imagine you spend all day in bed, doing nothing, then this is the amount of energy you need to keep you alive to do just that. The amount of energy that you do as you go about your daily life added to this figure will give you a very accurate estimate of how much energy your body has used that day.

This a very useful calculation as this can be used as a rough guide to know how much extra energy you really need to get through your day.

The section on “How many calories may I eat each day?”  highlighted how inaccurate the general information is for energy needs. The National Guides in the UK suggest 2500 calories for men and 2000 for women, but as we are all different these guides are very misleading. Using the Basal Metabolic Rate will offer much more personalised information. 

How to calculate your BMR

Men BMR =

88.362 + (13.397 x weight in kg) + (4.799 x height in cm) - (5.677 x age in years)

Women BMR

= 447.593 + (9.247 x weight in kg) + (3.098 x height in cm) - (4.330 x age in years)

 

Then with this figure multiply this by the figure which best describes your level of activity.

Little to no exercise Daily calories needed = BMR x 1.2

Light exercise (1–3 days per week) Daily calories needed = BMR x 1.375

Moderate exercise (3–5 days per week) Daily calories needed = BMR x 1.55

Heavy exercise (6–7 days per week) Daily calories needed = BMR x 1.725

Very heavy exercise (twice per day, extra heavy workouts) Daily calories needed = BMR x 1.9

This gives a much more accurate measure of the energy needs you have for yourself.

Follow the link to a quick Basal Metabolic Rate Calculator

Armed with this measure you can use it to slightly reduce your energy uptake and so, overtime make modest and sustainable weight loss until your BMI is within the normal range or at your target weight.


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